Editor’s Picks: Top Cars We Drove in 2021

© Perry Stern, Automotive Content Experience Top Cars of 2021
Another year has come and gone, and while 2021 moved back toward some sense of normalcy in America, the auto industry still has a ways to go before it can claim full recovery. Even so, car companies in the U.S. made up for lost time with an onslaught of all-new or redesigned models for the 2021 and 2022 model years, and we had the opportunity to get behind the wheel of most of these new cars. Given advanced technologies and modern manufacturing standards, there aren’t really any bad cars anymore, although these selections bubbled to the top as the best among the cars we’ve driven — the top cars of 2021.

© Mike Meredith, Automotive Content Experience 2021 Acura TLX Type S
After more than a decade, the 2021 TLX Type S marks the return of a Type S performance variant to the Acura lineup, powered by a new turbocharged 3.0-liter V6 engine producing 355 horsepower and 354 lb-ft of torque. Another unit in a long line of excellent engines from Honda, the new Type S Turbo V6 features a single twin-scroll turbocharger that incorporates technology from the mid-engine NSX. The engine gets mated with a sport-tuned 10-speed automatic transmission; the car has torque-vectoring Super Handling All-Wheel Drive exclusively tuned for the Type S. Active exhaust opens a valve for added exhaust sound above 4000 rpm: at all times in Sport + mode; in Normal mode at idle and acceleration; but not when cruising in Sport mode.

© Mike Meredith, Automotive Content Experience 2021 Acura TLX Type S
Firm, balanced and responsive, the 2021 Acura TLX Type S features a sport-tuned adaptive damper system and additional chassis bracing. New drivers will immediately discover the car feels like a performance sport sedan. The TLX steering is direct and responsive, making the car incredibly fun to drive with excellent acceleration and quick shifts. When accelerating through and out of tight corners, the SH-AWD directs more torque to the outside rear wheel to keep the car stable and balanced. Starting MSRP for 2021 Acura TLX Type S is $52,300 with 20-inch multi-spoke wheels and Pirelli Cinturato P7 all-season tires, or $53,100 with a high performance wheel and tire package that includes lighter NSX-inspired split 5-spoke wheels and Pirelli P-Zero summer tires. Prices do not include a destination charge of $1,025.

© Perry Stern, Automotive Content Experience 2021 Aston Martin DBX
The 2021 Aston Martin DBX has the distinction of being the first SUV to wear an Aston Martin badge in the company’s 108-year history, and a few days behind the wheel confirmed this new vehicle is clearly, purely Aston Martin. Although the concept of an Aston Martin SUV might be surprising, the DBX carries styling cues that make it easily identifiable as a member of the famed British marque, including the signature DB grille that flows into a vented, sculpted hood. In keeping with Aston Martin tradition, the DBX gets an elegant interior replete with high-quality materials. A floating center console with stylish wood veneer sits between the front seats, and a 10.25-inch display screen is integrated with the center dashboard in addition to a 12.3-inch driver display.

© Perry Stern, Automotive Content Experience 2021 Aston Martin DBX
Given the luxury marque’s storied history in racing (as well as cinema), an Aston Martin is about more than styling and luxury — and the DBX is no exception. This potent SUV possesses excellent performance thanks to its 4.0-liter twin-turbo V8 engine sourced from Mercedes-AMG; the unit generates 542 horsepower and 516 lb-ft of torque. According to Aston Martin, the DBX sprints to 60 mph in 4.3 seconds and reaches a top speed of 181 mph. We can’t attest to the top speed, but the acceleration figures seem spot on. Like a proper Aston Martin, the DBX takes on the role of Grand Tourer with aplomb, sporting plenty of power on tap and a comfortable, smooth ride. Although it cruises like a GT, the DBX can also be pushed like a sports car. Steering is precise with excellent feedback, and the SUV stays flat through corners thanks to all-wheel drive and tremendous grip from Pirelli P-Zero tires. Even though DBX is quintessentially Aston Martin, it still offers the capabilities of a proper SUV. The DBX has plenty of space in the rear seat and cargo areas, and if required it can tow up to 6,000 pounds.

© Mike Meredith, Automotive Content Experience 2021 Ford Bronco
As one of the most highly anticipated returns of a classic model in many years, the 2021 Ford Bronco is an all-new off-road-oriented vehicle that pays tribute in both design and capability to the original Ford Bronco of the 1960s. Even though the new vehicle is larger, modern and more capable, the proportions and design of the original 1966 Bronco influence the styling of the new Bronco — it retains the boxy shape and classic short-wheelbase of the 2-door variant, although a 4-door version is now offered as well. The Bronco 2-Door has a 100.4-inch wheelbase — more than 15 inches shorter than the 4-door version for better off-road maneuverability and an increased breakover angle.

© Perry Stern, Automotive Content Experience 2021 Ford Bronco
This year Ford provided us with a 2021 Bronco 2-Door Badlands equipped with the Sasquatch Package, making it the most off-road-capable version of the new Bronco from the factory. Base price for Bronco 2-Door Badlands with Advanced 4 x 4 is $42,095. The test vehicle we drove also included the Badlands Lux Package, a 2.7-liter EcoBoost Engine, a 10-speed automatic transmission, the Sasquatch Package and other options for a total price as tested of $56,150. The new Bronco is incredibly fun to drive since it sports such a unique look, capturing the style and design of the original yet in a new, modern interpretation that attracts a lot of attention. During our testing we were impressed by the on-road ride and handling, especially since the 2-door short-wheelbase version we drove came equipped with the Sasquatch Package and 35-inch Mud-Terrain tires. The Badlands Sasquatch tackles most off-road conditions easily.

© Perry Stern, Automotive Content Experience 2022 Ford Maverick
Following the introduction of its all-new F-150 full-size pickup truck, Ford comes to market with something a bit smaller — the all-new Maverick. As the only unibody pickup from Ford, the Maverick is exclusively a four-door truck with a 4.5-foot bed and classic pickup styling. Even though the pickup is available in a range of trim levels, the base-level Maverick XL has a long list of standard features including an 8-inch touchscreen display as well as Apple CarPlay and Android Auto — all for a base price less than $20,000. That low price also includes the standard powertrain — an efficient gas-electric hybrid.

© Perry Stern, Automotive Content Experience 2022 Ford Maverick
The Maverick’s standard hybrid powertrain is a 2.5-liter Atkinson-cycle 4-cylinder engine teamed with an electric traction motor for a combined output of 191 horsepower. The hybrid is only available with front-wheel drive — all-wheel drive can be ordered with the larger 2.0-liter 250-horsepower EcoBoost engine. Mavericks with the hybrid powertrain have U.S. EPA fuel-economy ratings of 42 mpg city / 33 mpg hwy / 37 mpg combined, yet can still tow up to 2,000 pounds or haul 1,500 pounds of cargo. Despite its diminutive size, the pickup bed of the 2022 Maverick can perform many functions of larger truck beds thanks to what Ford calls the Flexbed System, which includes tailgate tie-down cleats, an available 110-volt power outlet; multiple bed tiedowns; and pockets designed to hold 2 x 6 pieces of wood to act as dividers.

© Perry Stern, Automotive Content Experience 2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E / GT
The 2021 Mustang Mach-E marks the first time that Ford has bestowed the legendary Mustang name on an entirely new vehicle segment. Unlike any Mustang before it (or any Ford for that matter), the Mach-E is a full-electric 5-passenger crossover and easily one of the most advanced vehicles ever from the Blue Oval. It may not look like a Mustang, but it carries a number of styling cues from the legendary pony car including Mustang’s “running pony” logo centered in what would be the grille (if it needed a grille), as well as the sequentially illuminating triple taillights familiar to Mustang aficionados. Inside, the Mach-E has a clean design with practically no physical buttons and two display screens. The main 15.5-inch screen provides plenty of real estate, with one dial — for volume control – integrated at the bottom of the unit. The system is one of the most intuitive we’ve used, displaying icons for the most used items for quick access.

© Perry Stern, Automotive Content Experience 2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E / GT
Ford offers the Mach-E with rear- or all-wheel drive and standard or extended range batteries. The lithium-ion battery pack is located between the axles to provide a more spacious interior, as well as keep the crossover’s center of gravity lower for better handling and performance. Power outputs range from the 266 horsepower with the standard battery to the high-performance Mach-E GT that gets 480 horsepower and 600 lb-ft of torque from its dual motors. Even the base-level Mach-E feels quick with smooth power and fun-to-drive characteristics, but the GT will really set you back in the seat with impressive performance. It’s no wonder that North American journalists named Mach-E the North American Utility of the Year for 2021.

© Perry Stern, Automotive Content Experience 2022 Hyundai Santa Cruz
Ford’s Maverick isn’t the only new unibody pickup truck to roll out this year. Hyundai also joined the fun with the all-new Santa Cruz. Referred to as a Sport Adventure Vehicle, the Santa Cruz is Hyundai’s first vehicle designed specifically for the American consumer — although not specifically for the typical truck buyer. Like the Maverick, the Santa Cruz’s truck bed is not long — about four feet — although for many consumers that is more than enough length and space for trips to the nursery or for hauling muddy cargo. The bed sides contain adjustable anchor points with each anchor rated at 440 pounds. Depending on trim level, the Santa Cruz can handle around 1,700 pounds of payload. An additional lockable storage space is built into the bed floor, and the bed can be equipped with a retractable tonneau cover.

© Perry Stern, Automotive Content Experience 2022 Hyundai Santa Cruz
Santa Cruz is available with two engine options: a 191-horsepower 2.5-liter 4-cylinder or a more powerful 2.5-liter turbocharged powerplant that bumps up to 281 horsepower and 311 lb-ft of torque, the latter of which gets paired with a quick-shifting 8-speed dual-clutch gearbox. The normally aspirated engine is rated at a 3,500-pound towing capacity, while the turbo AWD variant can tow up to 5,000 pounds. Inside, the Santa Cruz has a premium feeling thanks to lines that flow from the center of the dash and wrap around the cabin. On up-level trims, the integrated driver display and large center display give a distinctively high-tech vibe. With the benefits and drivability of a small crossover combined with the utility of an open pickup truck bed, the Santa Cruz offers a level of versatility difficult to match.

© Hyundai Motor America 2021 Hyundai Sonata N-Line
Hyundai redesigned the Sonata for 2020 and added the sporty Sonata N Line for 2021 with a powerful Smartstream 2.5-liter turbocharged engine and N Brand design elements. Hyundai engineers reimagined the 2020 Sonata with a distinctive, dynamic design; the Sonata N Line builds on that by adding a more aggressive front fascia with cascading grille, three air intakes and N Line badging. The profile reveals 19-inch alloy wheels, side skirts and gloss black mirrors with integrated turn indicators. At the rear, Sonata N Line adds a black lower bumper, an N Line rear diffuser, quad exhaust outlets, a rear spoiler and full LED taillights. Inside, the Sonata N Line also receives performance updates including N sport front seats with Nappa leather bolsters and Dinamica suede inserts and a leather-wrapped N sport steering wheel.

© Hyundai Motor America 2021 Hyundai Sonata N-Line
The 2021 Sonata N Line draws power from a new turbocharged version of Hyundai’s 2.5-liter 4-cylinder engine producing 290 horsepower and 311 lb-ft of torque from 1650–4000 rpm, mated with a new N 8-Speed wet dual-clutch transmission with paddle shifters. To improve handling, the Sonata N Line suspension gets stiffer springs, stiffer stability bars, monotube dampers, more rigid chassis bushings and other chassis stiffening. Brakes are upgraded to 13.6-inch front rotors, 12.8-inch rear rotors and premium pad materials. The quick-ratio, rack-mounted, motor-driven steering system improves steering feel and feedback. The Sonata N Line feels like a sport sedan so it’s super fun to drive on twisty canyon roads. The chassis feels balanced and the steering responsive with excellent feedback. The traction and stability control systems do a great job putting power down when exiting corners — without too much intrusive intervention.

© Stellantis North America 2022 Jeep Grand Cherokee
One of the most successful SUVs of all time, the Grand Cherokee debuted its fifth-generation early in 2021 with the launch of the first-ever three-row 2021 Grand Cherokee L, now followed by a 5-seat 2022 Grand Cherokee that is 3.7 inches longer than the outgoing model but 11.4 inches less than the Grand Cherokee L. The roofline of the Grand Cherokee is lower and tapered, while the beltline is also lower to allow more light into the interior and improve outward visibility. The standard powerplant is a 3.6-liter Pentastar V6 engine producing 290 horsepower and 257 lb-ft of torque, with a tow rating of up to 6,200 pounds. The other engine choice is a 5.7-liter V8 producing 357 horsepower and 390 lb-ft of torque, which increases the towing capacity to 7,200 pounds. Both engines get teamed with an 8-speed automatic transmission. In early 2022 the Grand Cherokee 4xe plug-in hybrid will be added.

© Mike Meredith, Automotive Content Experience 2022 Jeep Grand Cherokee
The 2022 Jeep Grand Cherokee offers a choice of three 4WD systems: Quadra-Trac I, Quadra-Trac II and Quadra-Drive II. Jeep’s new Quadra-Lift air suspension features electronic adaptive damping that automatically adjusts to changing road conditions for improved comfort and control. Interior updates include a clean dashboard design with a horizontal lower wing, horizontal vents standard 10.1-inch display at the center with a combination of digital and physical buttons for quick navigation. The 2022 Jeep Grand Cherokee suspension has been tuned to be smooth on road while still providing off-road capability. As expected, the 2022 Jeep Grand Cherokee retains the off-road capability that confounds its rivals, particularly the off-road-focused Trailhawk, which includes a front anti-sway bar disconnect for improved suspension articulation in difficult off-road situations.

© Stellantis North America 2021 Jeep Wrangler 4xe
The first plug-in hybrid in the Jeep lineup, the Wrangler 4xe adds up to 21 miles of all-electric range — and an EPA rating of 49 MPGe — without losing any of the off-road capability expected from a Jeep Wrangler. The heart of the Wrangler 4xe is a high-tech hybrid powertrain that combines two electric motors with a turbocharged 2.0-liter gasoline engine for total system output of 375 horsepower and 470 lb-ft of torque. Power output for the 2.0-liter engine alone is 270 horsepower and 295 lb-ft of torque. All that power gets delivered through an 8-speed automatic transmission and standard full-time 4-wheel drive. According to Jeep, the Wrangler 4xe will accelerate from zero to 60 mph in 6.0 seconds.

© Stellantis North America 2021 Jeep Wrangler 4xe
A high-voltage eTorque generator / motor at the front of the Wrangler 4xe engine produces 44 horsepower and 39 lb-ft of torque, replacing a conventional alternator and starter motor. This motor connects to the driveshaft and spins the engine quickly and seamlessly for smooth start/stop operation while also generating electricity for the battery pack. A second motor / generator integrates with the automatic transmission and produces 134 horsepower and 181 lb-ft of torque. Depending on the needs of the powertrain, the gas engine can be completely disengaged so only the electric motor is sending power to the wheels. Alternatively, the engine can re-engage to allow power from both the gas engine and electric motor to flow through the transmission. The Jeep Trail Rated Wrangler 4xe features solid front and rear axles, full-time 4-wheel drive with a 2-speed transfer case, fully articulating suspension and the ability to traverse 30 inches of water.

© Mike Meredith, Automotive Content Experience 2021 Mazda Mazda3 2.5 Turbo
Mazda’s sport compact, the redesigned fourth-generation Mazda3 debuted as a 2019 model and for the first time offered all-wheel drive. Mazda has previously offered a hot-hatch version with the MAZDASPEED3, which returns without the MAZDASPEED name as the 2021 Mazda Mazda3 2.5 Turbo. The Japan-based automaker originally developed the SKYACTIV-G 2.5 engine for the larger CX-9 crossover, which was later added to the CX-5 and Mazda6 before making its way to the smaller Mazda3. The 2.5 Turbo engine produces 250 horsepower and 320 lb-ft of torque when using 93 octane gasoline, but even on 89 octane it’s rated at 227 horsepower and 310 lb-ft of torque at 2000 rpm. The 2.5 Turbo gets combined with a 6-speed automatic transmission with manual shift mode and Sport mode, as well as i-ACTIV AWD.

© Mike Meredith, Automotive Content Experience 2021 Mazda Mazda3 2.5 Turbo
Every Mazda3 we’ve ever driven has been a fun, engaging car, and the new Mazda3 2.5 Turbo is the best Mazda3 yet. The additional torque is immediate — for normal acceleration and everyday driving, little throttle input is needed in most situations. And the torque is always available at any speed — often with no need for a transmission downshift unless aggressive acceleration is required. The Mazda3 2.5 Turbo shines during spirited driving on twisty back roads. The chassis and steering feel responsive and balanced, and the advantage provided by all-wheel drive is immediate, delivering torque to the rear wheels to maintain balance through corners. A practical, compact hatchback at its core, the 2021 Mazda Mazda3 2.5 Turbo is the best Mazda3 ever, and one of the best hot hatches as well.

© Perry Stern, Automotive Content Experience 2022 Mercedes-AMG EQS
Earlier this year Mercedes-Benz entered the electric car fray with the luxurious EQS —a full-size luxury electric sedan. As a proper (and expected) follow up, the Mercedes-AMG EQS joins the lineup as the first all-electric model from AMG. The AMG designation translates to more power, stiffer suspension, better handling and, in most cases, a throaty roar from quad exhaust outlets. The EQS also has all these attributes — except the last, since nobody will hear it approaching. That said, they will see it, and some may not be crazy about its jellybean-like shape, although there is function behind that form. Without the need to build around an internal combustion engine and powertrain, Mercedes engineers and designers were able to concentrate on aerodynamics, making this one of the most slippery (aerodynamically speaking) cars on the road.

nbsp2022 Mercedes-AMG EQS
The 2022 Mercedes-AMG EQS has two electric motors that produce 649 horsepower and 700 lb-ft of torque — certainly performance figures appropriate for an AMG model. And if that’s not enough, with the AMG DYNAMIC PLUS package the driver can briefly dial up to 751 horsepower and 752 lb-ft of torque using the RACE START function, which will move this big sedan to 60 mph in a mere 3.4 seconds. Thanks to 4-wheel steering and all-wheel drive, the EQS can be tossed through bends like a sports car — a proper AMG sports car. Inside, the AMG EQS gets the extreme MBUX Hyperscreen display. This high-tech system consists of a 12.3-inch instrument cluster, a 17.7-inch OLED center display and a 12.3-inch OLED passenger display — all housed under a 56-inch curved glass surface. This display spans from door to door and adds a fitting level of high-tech design.

© Perry Stern, Automotive Content Experience 2022 Polestar 2
For many years, the Polestar name had been the high-performance arm of Volvo, but in 2018 the Volvo Car Group announced that Polestar would become its own standalone electrified performance brand. Following the limited-edition hybrid Polestar 1, the Polestar 2 is the brand’s first full-electric model. Designed as a 5-door fastback, the Polestar 2 is built on Volvo’s Compact Modular Architecture platform that integrates the battery pack into the floor for improved chassis rigidity and reductions in noise, vibration and harshness. This translates to a solid, comfortable ride with excellent handling and quick acceleration with either of the power options.

© Perry Stern, Automotive Content Experience 2022 Polestar 2
Polestar 2 is available in two variants: Long Range Single Motor and Long Range Dual Motor. With a single motor driving the front wheels, the Polestar 2 gets 231 horsepower and a range approaching 270 miles. The dual motor version bumps up to 408 horsepower but range drops to around 250 miles. The 2021 Polestar 2 is as much about technology as it is about electrification — it is the first car to embed Google’s Android operating system as the platform for its infotainment system. In addition to bringing together apps and vehicle functions, the Polestar 2 features embedded Google services such as Google Maps, Google Assistant and the Google Play Store.

© Perry Stern, Automotive Content Experience 2022 Rolls-Royce Ghost Black Badge
About a year ago Rolls-Royce introduced the new Ghost, and this luxurious sedan quickly became one of the fastest-selling models in the company’s history. With a smooth, powerful ride and the ultimate comfort and technology, the Ghost has a presence unlike anything else on the road. Now Rolls-Royce introduces a new Ghost that is a bit darker, edgier and — dare we say it — sportier: the Black Badge Ghost. The shape of the Ghost remains the same, so there’s no mistaking it for anything else, although the Black Badge version gets unique treatment that further differentiates the vehicle from a “standard” Ghost. Most noticeable is the dark Pantheon Grille and Spirit of Ecstasy ornament at the front.

© Perry Stern, Automotive Content Experience 2022 Rolls-Royce Ghost Black Badge
Powering the Rolls-Royce Black Badge Ghost is the luxury marque’s 6.75-liter twin-turbo V12 engine with output increased over the standard Ghost to produce 591 horsepower and 664 lb-ft of torque. With upgrades to the Planar Suspension System, all-wheel drive and four-wheel steering, the Black Badge Ghost exhibits impressive handling, especially for a car of its size; a burbling exhaust note is a nice byproduct. The Ghost retains its elegant cabin but also gets the Black Badge treatment, including darkened air vents and subdued chrome finish. Black Badge Ghost emphasizes unique materials inside, making extensive use of a new complex material called Technical Fiber. For those who have the means, the Black Badge Ghost delivers the utmost in luxury and exclusivity with extreme, velvet-smooth performance all wrapped in an elegant — but slightly sinister — package.

© Subaru of America 2022 Subaru BRZ
The Subaru BRZ is a lightweight, rear-drive coupe both affordable and practical, with an emphasis on fun for the driving enthusiast. This new BRZ is longer and wider than the previous model with a new exterior design, wide frontal area, functional side vents, narrow greenhouse, bold fenders and the roof features a subtle double-bubble shape. At the rear of the car, the fenders flow into a new taillight design and rear valance with dual exhaust. The upper rear shoulders and rear glass result in a short decklid with an upturned ducktail rear spoiler. The 2022 Subaru BRZ has a new 2.4-liter 4-cylinder boxer engine that produces 228 horsepower and 184 lb-ft of torque — an increase of 23 horsepower and 33 lb-ft of torque over the outgoing model. The new engine gets paired with either a 6-speed manual transmission or an optional 6-speed automatic with steering wheel paddle shifters.

© Subaru of America 2022 Subaru BRZ
The new chassis of the 2022 BRZ is 50 percent more rigid than the previous model, and the center of gravity is actually lower as well, offering a nearly perfect front-to-rear weight distribution. The new vehicle stability control systems has five settings, and it can even be turned off completely to give the driver full control. Inside, the 2022 Subaru BRZ focuses on the driver with new customizable 7-inch digital dashboard. The new BRZ stays true to the original but the additional horsepower is welcome, and the additional torque is particularly noticeable in the mid-rpm range. On rough back roads in New York and Connecticut en route to Lime Rock Park the ride read a little firm, although a fair trade-off for the control and precision experienced on track. Balanced and responsive, the BRZ is a car that any driving enthusiast would enjoy. Overall the BRZ feels well balanced, particularly in transitions from side-to-side between corners, and the car remains incredibly stable under hard braking.

nbsp2022 Subaru WRX
Twenty years since the rally-inspired WRX first arrived for the U.S. market, the fifth-generation debuts for the 2022 model year, built on the stiffer Subaru Global Platform and powered by a turbocharged 2.4-liter flat 4-cylinder Boxer engine. With exclusive body panels no longer shared with Impreza, the evolutionary design features a larger hexagonal grille, a hood scoop, a revised front fascia, bulging fenders and somewhat controversial fender cladding. Subaru explains that the cladding improves aerodynamics, including its textured surface. The new design tapers at the rear with new connected taillights, rear spoiler and an aggressive quad exhaust. The 2.4-liter engine produces 271 horsepower and 258 lb-ft of torque and gets combined with a standard 6-speed manual transmission or available CVT dubbed Subaru Performance Transmission.

nbsp2022 Subaru WRX
Inside, the sport-inspired interior of the WRX includes seats with more panels, larger side bolsters and larger lower seat bolsters that are more comfortable and more supportive. The WRX continues as an all-weather sport sedan that offers a great value as a performance sedan but is practical and easy to live with as an everyday car. We had the opportunity to drive the new WRX on twisty, shaded roads west from Napa out to the Pacific Coast Highway in Northern California. With cold temperatures and leaves and dirt on the winding roads, the new WRX remained stable, balanced and a blast to drive. The WRX has plenty of power that makes it engaging without straying into difficulty. With its new, stiffer platform, the suspension is firm but not as jarring as the previous model. Scheduled to arrive in spring 2022, WRX pricing has not been released.

© Perry Stern, Automotive Content Experience 2022 Toyota GR Supra 2.0
Following the introduction of the GR Supra last year, Toyota comes to market with a more affordable 4-cylinder version: the Toyota GR Supra 2.0. After spending a few days in the Supra 2.0, we’re simply going to go ahead and say it: Less power can actually be more fun. Most people won’t see that this is a lesser-priced variant: aside from its slightly smaller wheels (18-inch vs. 19-inch) and some minor trim variances, the 2.0 is almost indistinguishable from 6-cylinder-powered 3.0. Toyota designers kept the Supra’s interior stylish yet simple — as a sports car should be. The 8.8-inch display screen is easy to read and navigate, incorporating physical buttons and a controller in the center console for quick access to features such as media and navigation. Some well-placed carbon fiber trim also adds to the car’s sporty nature, as do the leather and Alcantara-trimmed sport seats.

© Perry Stern, Automotive Content Experience 2022 Toyota GR Supra 2.0
Powering the 2021 Toyota GR Supra 2.0 is a 2.0-liter twin-scroll turbocharged 4-cylinder engine producing 255 horsepower and 295 lb-ft of torques. Peak torque starts at a low 1550 rpm which makes the engine very responsive. Like its more powerful sibling, the Supra 2.0 is only available with an 8-speed automatic transmission. From the moment a driver slides behind the wheel of the 2021 Toyota GR Supra 2.0, the pleasing exhaust note and responsive throttle immediately inspire a smile. About 220 pounds lighter than the Supra 3.0, the Supra 2.0 feels light and nimble with excellent steering and agile performance. The 2.0 offers excellent performance with everyday drivability, and with a price that starts $8,000 less than the 3.0, the lesser-powered model could very well be the right Supra to buy.

 

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